Question: Why Did US Nuke Japan?

Why was Hiroshima chosen?

Hiroshima was chosen because it had not been targeted during the US Air Force’s conventional bombing raids on Japan, and was therefore regarded as being a suitable place to test the effects of an atomic bomb..

How far away can a nuclear bomb be felt?

Within a 6-km (3.7-mile) radius of a 1-megaton bomb, blast waves will produce 180 tonnes of force on the walls of all two-storey buildings, and wind speeds of 255 km/h (158 mph). In a 1-km (0.6-mile) radius, the peak pressure is four times that amount, and wind speeds can reach 756 km/h (470 mph).

Why was the atomic bomb a bad idea?

Another argument against the use of the atomic bombs as the end of World War II was that it was immoral for the United States to use two atomic bombs against Japan so quickly together. … The next argument against the use of the atomic bombs was that the United States only used it as a way of scaring the Soviet Union.

What are 3 reasons why the US used the atomic bomb on Japan?

REASONS IN FAVOR OF THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF JAPANIt led to a quick end to World War II.It saved the lives of American soldiers.It potentially saved the lives of Japanese soldiers and civilians.It forced Japan to surrender, which it appeared unwilling to do.It was revenge for Japan’s attack at Pearl Harbor.It matched the brutality that Japan used during the war.More items…

Was the US justified in dropping the atomic bomb on Japan?

In the final days of the Second World War, on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Despite U.S. claims to the contrary, these actions were neither justified nor decisive in Japan’s surrender. … The First World War, “the war to end all wars” ended in 1918.

Why didnt US bomb Tokyo?

The U.S. likely did not target Tokyo for the atomic bomb strikes as it was the seat of the Emperor and the location of much of the high ranking military officers. … Inclement weather kept the Bockscar from dropping the second atomic bomb on Kokura.

How many lives were saved by dropping the atomic bomb?

Ten Million LivesBack to Hiroshima: Why Dropping the Bomb Saved Ten Million Lives.

Was bombing Japan necessary?

“No. And it wasn’t necessary either. Militarily Japan was finished (as the Soviet invasion of Manchuria that August showed). Further blockade and urban destruction would have produced a surrender in August or September at the latest, without the need for the costly anticipated invasion or the atomic bomb.

What would have happened if the atomic bomb wasn’t dropped?

There’s a belief that the United States didn’t have to drop the atomic bombs to win the war. … The result would lead to many more casualties for both the Allies and Japan, possibly even surpassing the over 200,000 civilians who perished from the bombs.

Why did the US bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki specifically?

The target committee decided the A-bomb had to kill. At the time, American bombers were already firebombing many cities, killing tens of thousands. … But they wanted it to be horrible, to end the war and to try to stop the future use of nuclear bombs. They chose Hiroshima.

How many people died from Hiroshima?

Over the next two to four months, the effects of the atomic bombings killed between 90,000 and 146,000 people in Hiroshima and 39,000 and 80,000 people in Nagasaki; roughly half occurred on the first day.

Why did we bomb Japan and not Germany?

Groves states that the commanders believed that the war in Germany was almost over and that Japan would be a better target. This was also based on the construction of Japanese buildings and the strong aerial defense Germany had. To carry the Little Boy and Fat Man bombs, B-29 planes had to be modified.

Is Hiroshima still radioactive?

Among some there is the unfounded fear that Hiroshima and Nagasaki are still radioactive; in reality, this is not true. Following a nuclear explosion, there are two forms of residual radioactivity. … In fact, nearly all the induced radioactivity decayed within a few days of the explosions.

Are there any living survivors of Hiroshima?

The actual number of Japanese Americans affected by the bombings is unknown – although estimates put approximately 11,000 in Hiroshima city alone – but some 3,000 of them are known to have survived and returned to the U.S. after the war.